Genomes

2022 | Nanibaa’ Garrison: “The Humane Pangenome Project: a global resource to map genomic diversity” (2022)

2022 | Nanibaa’ Garrison: “The Humane Pangenome Project: a global resource to map genomic diversity” (2022)

Image by ISG Senior Artist Amisha Gadani Congratulations to ISG Faculty member, Nanibaa’ Garrison, for her co-authoring most recent publication, The Humane Pangenome Project: a global resource to map genomic diversity, in the nature journal on April 20, 2022. Abstract The human reference genome is the most widely used resource in human genetics and is due for a major update. Its…

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VIDEO: DIY Biology Lecture with Dr. Josiah Zayner

On Wednesday, November 28, 2018, the Biotechnology and Society Freshman Cluster course hosted Dr. Josiah Zayner as part of its DIY Biology Lecture series (co-hosted by the Institute for Society and Genetics and the UCLA Cluster Program). Dr. Zayner shared his insights on biohacking, human genome editing, and public participation in science with UCLA students, faculty and the community at…

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Google Has Released an AI Tool That Makes Sense of Your Genome

Almost 15 years after scientists first sequenced the human genome, making sense of the enormous amount of data that encodes human life remains a formidable challenge. But it is also precisely the sort of problem that machine learning excels at. On Monday, Google released a tool called DeepVariant that uses the latest AI techniques to build a more accurate picture of a…

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How Neanderthals Influenced Human Genetics at the Crossroads of Asia and Europe

When the ancestors of modern humans migrated out of Africa, they passed through the Middle East and Turkey before heading deeper into Asia and Europe. Here, at this important crossroads, it’s thought that they encountered and had sexual rendezvous with a different hominid species: the Neanderthals. Genomic evidence shows that this ancient interbreeding occurred, and Western Asia is the most likely…

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Two Ancient DNA Studies Provide New Insights into Lives of Neanderthals and Paleolithic Humans

Two separate teams of researchers have used advanced DNA sequencing methods to analyze the 52,000-year-old remains of a Neanderthal woman from Vindija Cave in Croatia, and the 34,000-year-old remains of four anatomically modern humans from the Upper Paleolithic archaeological site of Sunghir. The findings are published in two papers in the journal Science. Kay Prüfer et al. A high-coverage Neandertal genome from Vindija…

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How The Genome Sets its Functional Micro-Architecture

The genes that are involved in the development of the fetus are activated in different tissues and at different times. Their expression is carefully regulated by so-called “enhancer sequences”, which are often located far from their target genes, and requires the DNA molecule to loop around and bring them in close proximity to their target genes. Such 3D changes of…

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