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Category Archives: environment

Why are some wild animals more tolerant to human interaction than others?

When most wild animals first encounter humans, they respond as […]

Genetic Differences Among Monkeys in Tanzania Show Troubling Pattern

An endangered monkey species in Tanzania is living in geographical […]

International Ob-Gyn Group Urges Greater Efforts to Prevent Toxic Chemical Exposure

Dramatic increases in exposure to toxic chemicals in the last […]

Flatworms Could Replace Mammals for Some Toxicology Tests

Scientists at UC San Diego have discovered that planarians, commonly […]

Scientists Identify Tissue-Degrading Enzyme in Bat-Killing Fungus

Scientists at UC San Francisco and Brown University have figured […]

Common Chemicals Linked to Early Menopause

Fifteen chemicals that disrupt our endocrine hormonal systems have been […]

2015 | Jessica Lynch Alfaro, et.al – Biogeography of squirrel monkeys (genus Saimiri): South-central Amazon origin and rapid pan-Amazonian diversification of a lowland primate

ISG faculty, Dr. Jessica Lynch Alfaro, Dr. Michael E. Alfaro, et […]

Endangered Monkeys in the Amazon Are More Diverse Than Previously Thought, UCLA Study Finds

Research by UCLA life scientists and 50 colleagues sheds new […]